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Propane

Basics

  • Propane, also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or autogas, is a clean-burning, high energy alternative fuel. Propane is stored under pressure inside a tank as a liquid; as pressure is released the liquid propane vaporizes and turns into gas that is used in a combustion engine.

Vehicles

  • There are two types of propane vehicles: dedicated and bi-fuel. Dedicated propane vehicles are designed to run only on propane, while bi-fuel propane vehicles have two separate fueling systems that allow the vehicles to use either propane or gasoline.

Benefits

  • LPG-fueled vehicles can produce significantly lower amounts of some harmful emissions and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2). Low maintenance costs are one reason behind propane’s popularity. Propane’s high octane rating and low carbon and oil contamination characteristics have resulted in documented engine life of up to two times that of gasoline engines.  

More Information

  • Propane is stored onboard a vehicle in a tank pressurized to about 150 pounds per square inch (psi). Propane has a higher octane rating than gasoline, which can decrease engine knock. However, it has a lower Btu rating than gasoline, so it requires more propane to drive the same distance as it would gasoline.  

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