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08.01.17

Come join the City of Charlotte in partnership with Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition in celebrating and learning more about electric vehicles and sustainable transportation! See why alternative transportation choices are dominating the discussion on September 15th from 11am to 2pm.  This interactive showcase event is open to the public and will be held at GovPorch in front of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Government Center. The address is 600 E. 4th Street, Charlotte, NC 28202. There will be multiple electric vehicles on display, information and resources from community partners, food, and entertainment! We welcome all volunteers, electric vehicles, and the public to come explore! We hope to make it our biggest Drive Electric event yet! Registration is here and the formal event announcement is here.

NDEW 2016  NDEW 2015
NDEW 2015  NDEW 2016

 

 

07.24.17

 

Mecklenburg County Air Quality GRADE program

Over $100,000 AVAILABLE!  Apply by September 1, 2017

 

Rebates for 25% - 50% of the cost to replace older heavy-duty diesel on-road vehicles

and off-road equipment with newer, cleaner vehicles and equipment.

 

Must operate in Cabarrus, Gaston, Iredell, Lincoln, Mecklenburg,

Rowan, Union (NC), and York (SC) counties to be eligible.

 

For more eligibility details and to apply please visit

www.GRADEplus.net

 

Mecklenburg County Air Quality

 

07.20.17
Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition is pleased to announce the launch of the Fall 2017 term of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Clean Cities University Workforce Development Program (CCUWDP). This fall, CCUWDP is offering 38 workforce development program positions across the nation and applications are now available.  The Greater Charlotte region and the Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition are one of the 38 picked! This is a wonderful opportunity for students looking to gain experience in the energy and transportation areas. Please pass this information along to anyone you know who may be interested in one of these positions. Applications can be found at http://www.cvent.com/d/n5qt98 with more information below. Applications are due August 8, 2017. If you have any questions, please email cleancitiesintern [at] anl [dot] gov

Clean Cities Logo

 

Clean Cities University Workforce Development Program Fall 2017 

 

The Clean Cities University Workforce Development Program is an initiative of Clean Cities, a government-industry partnership sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. Clean Cities strives to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector in nearly 100 communities across the country. Since the creation of the CCUWDP in 2010, Clean Cities has hosted more than 300 interns in more than 60 Coalitions. 
 

The Clean Cities internship will give students studying communications, public relations, business, marketing, engineering or environmental sciences, the opportunity to grow public awareness and expand the markets of advanced vehicle technologies, alternative fuels, and practices that reduce the consumption of petroleum. Students have participated in research, outreach activities, public education, K-12 outreach, fleet events, and a vast array of transportation-related environmental projects.

Specific Details:

  • Up to 38 internships available at competitively-selected U.S. Clean Cities Coalition locations working with dynamic Clean Cities coordinators and their stakeholders
  • Positions are 15 or 20 hours per week (determined by the coalition) for 14 weeks each semester
  • Internship dates: approximately September 5, 2017 through December 18, 2017. Exact start/end dates determined by individual coalitions
  • Stipends range from $2,500 - $4,200 depending on academic classification and number of hours assigned by the coalition.
  • Many past internships have led to permanent positions!

Applications are due August 8, 2017. To submit your resume and complete the online application, please click here. If selected, interns will be notified by September 1, 2017.

Questions? Email: CleanCitiesIntern [at] anl [dot] gov

 

07.13.17

Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition is proud to see our article about the Sea 2 Shining Sea Natural Gas Vehicle Road Rally published by the Fuels Fix Ezine. The article, listed on page 12, gives some high-level perspective on a very successful event held with the help of co-sponsors, Agility Fuel Solutions! There is also a summary of the whole Road Rally on page 18. See link for access to the article and the full Fuels Fix Ezine. https://issuu.com/jgoverly/docs/fuelsfix_summer2017_pdf 

07.12.17

The July Core Stakeholder meeting webinar is now confirmed for July 19th from 10am to 12pm. More details are available here. Please contact Carina Soriano at 704.688.7035 or by csoriano [at] centralina [dot] org (email) for instructions and information on how to register.

07.12.17

Where can I find statistics and information about car sharing networks in the United States, specifically those that have deployed plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)?

Carsharing networks are gaining popularity in the United States, and many carsharing programs are exploring innovative ways to incorporate PEVs into the mix. Please see below for information about carsharing networks and their benefits, including case studies of organizations working to implement or expand their carshare operations.

Background Information

For background information about Clean Cities’ involvement in carsharing networks, which are typically included under the umbrella term of “smart mobility,” we recommend you refer to the following Clean Cities Now newsletter from Winter 2017: http://www.afdc.energy.gov/uploads/publication/ccn_20_2.pdf. In particular, see the excerpts below:

Defining Smart Mobility

So what is “smart mobility”? The transportation industry uses the term to describe a systems-based approach to address the transportation challenges of today. These challenges arise from the rapid growth of urban populations, combined with the demand for individual mobility solutions, often without the use of a personal vehicle. A 2015 report (https://dupress.deloitte.com/dup-us-en/industry/public-sector/smart-mobility-trends.html) released by professional services firm Deloitte summarized smart mobility as the demand for “faster, greener, and cheaper transportation options.” Established smart mobility solutions, such as rideshare and bicycle commuting, have been supplemented in recent years by on-demand ride services (e.g., Lyft and Uber), expanded multi-modal transit (i.e., a combination of driving, public transit, biking, or walking), and the promise of more advanced connected and automated vehicles (CAVs)[…]

Capitalizing on Clean Cities’ Strengths

Clean Cities is no stranger to the transportation system efficiency strategies that have preceded more recent smart mobility solutions. In fact, many Clean Cities coalitions are already actively involved in projects that use data and technology to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). These include ridesharing, mass transit, active transit, multi-modal transport, teleworking, and fleet solutions—such as route optimization, driver behavior changes, and rightsizing. In 2015 alone, Clean Cities saved 26 million gasoline gallon equivalents through VMT reduction programs. In addition, these initiatives are often tied into alternative fuel initiatives. For instance, San Diego Regional Clean Cities and Eastern Pennsylvania Alliance for Clean Transportation have teamed up with local PEVcarsharing companies and other partners on efforts to install and utilize electric vehicle charging equipment.

Moving forward, Clean Cities will play a critical role in data measurement and collection, technical assistance, policy advancement, local outreach, and engaging fleets and consumers in advancing smart mobility efforts. For example, existing efforts to install telematics on fleet vehicles can be combined with CAV technology data collection to further the associated commercialization work. Many coalitions are also seeing the benefit of integrating PEV technologies with local smart mobility pilot programs and initiatives. As a result, coalitions around the country are developing stronger relationships with their state transportation agencies, metropolitan planning organizations, carsharing and ridesharing companies, and other new partners. “Across the country, we have already seen Clean Cities coalitions tap into their networks and capabilities to offer smart mobility solutions,” said Dennis A. Smith, national Clean Cities director. “Combined with the work that Clean Cities has done over the last 20+ years, the growth of smart cities efforts will transform the transportation market in the near future.”

As the above publication mentions, one of the biggest benefits from carsharing networks is reduced VMT, and thus reduced petroleum use—especially in the case of deploying PEVs in the carsharing fleet.

The University of California – Berkeley’s Transportation Sustainability Research Center has studied the benefits and growth of car sharing in North America (http://tsrc.berkeley.edu/carsharing). Please note that we cannot verify the accuracy of this resource. We have provided a summary of carsharing benefits and membership below:

“Carsharing allows people to rent cars on a short-term (hourly or daily), as-needed basis, paying only for the time they use the car and the mileage they drive. The operators of the carsharing program provide vehicle maintenance, repair, and insurance.[…]

Shared-use vehicles allow individuals to gain the benefits of using a private car without the costs and responsibilities of owning a car.  Members of a shared-use vehicle or carsharing program pick-up and return vehicles at shared use lots that are scattered throughout a particular region or concentrated at a transit station, activity or employment center.  Typically, a member makes a reservation in advance, lets him or herself into the vehicle with a personal card or key, and drives away.  When the person is done using the car, she returns the car to its home parking space, locks it, and leaves it for the next carsharer. […]

The benefits of carsharing can include:

· More careful consideration of the necessity, duration, and distance of automobile trips, resulting in decreased vehicle use and ownership.

· Greater consideration given to alternative modes, resulting in increased transit ridership, biking, and walking.

· Cost savings to individuals and employers.

· Energy savings and air quality benefits.

· Reduced parking demand at participating transit stations, member employer sites, and residential locations. 

Due to its many potential benefits, carsharing is gaining in popularity, as demonstrated by increasing North American membership.

· As of January 2014, 24 U.S. carsharing programs claimed 1,228,573 members sharing 17,179 vehicles.”

As you can see, there are a number of benefits from implementing car sharing programs, and there is a relatively large following for the service as well. This resource also includes a list of U.S. carsharing operations, including links to find more information.

You may also be interested in the Victoria Transport Policy Institute publication, Evaluating Carsharing Benefits (http://www.vtpi.org/carshare.pdf), which breaks down the various considerations involved with carsharing networks, including expenses and vehicle use as compared to other modes of transportation. Note that we cannot verify the information in this resource. This analysis concluded the following:

“Carsharing gives consumers a practical alternative to owning a personal vehicle that is driven less than about 6,000 miles (10,000 kilometres) per year. Carsharing has lower fixed costs and higher variable costs than private vehicle ownership. This price structure makes occasional use of a vehicle affordable, even to low-income households. It also gives drivers an incentive to minimize their vehicle use and rely on other travel options as much as possible. Carsharing typically reduces average vehicle use by 40-60% among drivers who rely on it, making it an important transportation demand management strategy.”

More specific information about the benefits of carsharing, as well as methods to maximize the benefits from carsharing services, is available on pages 5 through 7.

Emissions Impacts and PEV Deployment

Regarding the emissions benefits of carsharing programs, Zero- and Low-Emission Vehicles in U.S. Carsharing Fleets: Impacts of Exposure on Member Perceptions (http://tsrc.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/ZEV%20Whitepaper_FINAL_0.pdf), evaluates how implementing zero- and low-emission vehicles, including PEVs, into carsharing fleets can increase interest in these vehicle types among consumers. This publication also discusses the emissions impacts of deploying these vehicles in carsharing fleets:

“Martin and Shaheen (2011) found that the observed (due to sold vehicles) and full impact (due to sold and postponed vehicle purchases) on GHG emissions by roundtrip carsharing users was a reduction of 0.58 t to 0.84 t GHG/year per household, respectively (or a 34% to 41% decline in GHG emission reductions). They further observed a decline in VMT of 27% (observed) to 43% (full impact) overall across all households.[…]

At present, BMW, Daimler, Ford, and Toyota are among the leading major automakers deploying EVs in carsharing fleets. Other carsharing systems have incorporated plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHVs) and EVs from several manufacturers, including Toyota and Nissan, into their fleets of regular internal combustion engine vehicles. This incorporation of PHVs/EVs into shared vehicle fleets exposes this technology to a large array of potential customers that would otherwise have far less or no exposure. […]

Exposure to PHVs or EVs through carsharing has influenced customer EV perceptions to be more positive and has commensurately increased the propensity for an individual to buy an EV[..].”

Additionally, researchers from the University of Virginia and the University of Texas at Austin conducted a lifecycle analysis (http://www.caee.utexas.edu/prof/kockelman/public_html/TRB15carsharingLCA.pdf) of the emissions from implementing a carsharing program with conventional gasoline vehicles. You may find the conclusions of the study below:

“Results 31 suggest that current carsharing members reduce their average individual transportation energy use and GHG emissions by approximately 51% upon joining a carsharing organization. Collectively, these individual-level effects translate to roughly 5% savings in all household transport-related energy use and GHG emissions in the U.S. These energy and emissions savings can be primarily attributed to mode shifts and avoided travel, followed by savings in parking infrastructure demands and fuel consumption. When indirect rebound effects are accounted for (assuming travel-cost savings is then spent on other goods and services), these savings fall to as little as 3% across all U.S. households.”

You may find a table displaying the impacts of carsharing networks on travel behavior on page 7. Note that this study evaluates conventional gasoline vehicles and not alternative fuel vehicles. However, the study included the following note regarding the additional benefits from PEV carsharing fleets:

"Finally, it should be noted that this study compares a shared fleet of conventional (internal combustion engine) sedans to the average U.S. passenger vehicle’s use. With smaller, hybrid and electric vehicles growing in popularity, carsharing’s energy and GHG emissions savings will probably grow.”

Navigant Research also released a report (https://www.navigantresearch.com/research/carsharing-programs) highlighting the growth of carsharing programs, including the role that PEVs will play. Note that this report requires purchase—however, you may view sample content for free by creating an account. In particular, the publication summary states that “[a]lthough the carshare service model has been well established over the past 15 years, there have been some significant innovations in the market recently. The success of one-way carsharing services is prompting more companies to consider offering this service model. Such services can increase utilization since members can use one-way carsharing for shorter, spur of the moment trips. Automakers have entered this market with good results, building substantial membership levels in only a few years. Meanwhile, the adoption of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in carsharing services is expected to increase as automakers promote this technology. According to Navigant Research, global carsharing services revenue is expected to grow from $1.1 billion in 2015 to $6.5 billion in 2024.” You may also find a list of “Key Industry Players,” including carshare companies, on the summary page referenced above.

Case Studies

For a Clean Cities spin on carsharing programs, please refer to the following case studies, sourced from the Winter 2017 Clean Cities Now, as well as the Alternative Fuels Data Center Case Studies database (http://www.afdc.energy.gov/case).

Clean Fuels Ohio

Clean Fuels Ohio Columbus, Ohio, is leading the charge on smart mobility to address transportation challenges. As the winner of DOT’s Smart City Challenge funding, Columbus is receiving up to $40 million from DOT and a $10 million investment from Vulcan Inc., as well as the $90 million that the city raised from private partners. In their proposal to DOT, Columbus set a vision for how technology can contribute to a more connected community. Sam Spofforth, Clean Fuels Ohio executive director, was pivotal in developing the Vulcan Inc. portion of the Smart City Challenge application. He leveraged the natural strengths of Clean Cities to bring together a diverse coalition of non-traditional stakeholders—from regional planning commissions to transportation network companies—to propose a plan that focused on fleet electrification, electrification of carsharing and other innovative mobility services, consumer PEV adoption, public electric vehicle charging, and grid decarbonization. Clean Fuels Ohio will also assist with project implementation.

To other coalitions interested in becoming involved with smart mobility solutions, Spofforth says, “Grab a seat at the table where the conversations are taking place. Use the strengths and resources that Clean Cities coalitions have to offer to make connections, develop projects, identify funding sources, and include a diversity of stakeholders. Stay focused on how all of this relates to the core mission of Clean Cities and define smart mobility broadly.”

Columbia-Willamette Clean Cities

By thinking out of the box, Portland, Oregon, is creating a culture of “complete communities” that support all forms of mobility. “The Smart City Challenge encouraged our coalition and stakeholders to be creative and experiment with the newest technologies, such as CAVs, multimodal systems, electric assist bicycles, and carshare programs,” said Brian Trice, coordinator for Columbia-Willamette Clean Cities (CWCC).

Like Clean Fuels Ohio, CWCC assisted the City of Portland—a Smart City Challenge finalist—with the Vulcan Inc. proposal. Trice participated in planning meetings and provided fleet information and infrastructure analyses. Many CWCC stakeholders were also involved in proposal development, offering programs to expand workplace charging infrastructure and accelerate PEV adoption, particularly in low-income communities. Although Portland was not awarded funds, Trice says that local Smart City Challenge partners are moving forward with a smart mobility project and believes that efforts to create diverse solutions to improve transportation efficiency will continue.

Kansas City Regional Clean Cities

Kelly Gilbert, Kansas City Regional Clean Cities program director, believes that interoperability among the first- and last-mile is a key notion of smart mobility. “We are developing a simple way for people in our region to subscribe to and use a transit, bikesharing, or carsharing program through a single payment option,” Gilbert said.

Western Washington Clean Cities (http://www.afdc.energy.gov/case/1843)

This case study details the estimated petroleum and emissions reductions that Seattle-based King County Metro Rideshare expects to experience with their EV fleet and electric vehicle supply equipment installations. During the course of their seven-year life in the commuter van program, the EVs will collectively reduce petroleum use by an estimated 218,000 gallons over prior modes of transportation. Fleet greenhouse gas emissions are estimated to be reduced by 24 metric tons per month in 2014 compared with emissions prior to the EV program.

San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition (http://www.afdc.energy.gov/case/543)

Learn how Car2Go launched an all-electric carsharing fleet in San Diego. The first year of the program resulted in over 5,000 electrified trips each week.

 

06.22.17

Question of the Month: What's new for Clean Cities mobile tools and resources?

Answer:

Two new mobile tools have recently become available:

  • Station Locator app for Android: Android users can now access the Station Locator app through the Google Play store. As with the original iPhone app version, users can access the Station Locator from their mobile device and find the 20 closest stations within a 30-mile radius. Results display either on a map or in a list with station addresses, phone numbers, and hours of operation. Also available for iPhone from the iTunes store.
  • Trip Calculator mobile page: FuelEconomy.gov recently launched a mobile web page version of their popular Trip Calculator tool. This page allows users to easily calculate fuel economy for a trip while on the go.

Other Mobile Resources

  • AFDC Station Locator mobile page: If you’d rather not use an app, the Station Locator mobile page provides an easy way to view alternative fueling station information on your smartphone screen, regardless of the type of mobile device used. Users can access the Station Locator by navigating to this link in an internet browser.
  • Find-a-Car app (Android and iPhone): The Find-a-Car app allows users to view the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fuel economy ratings, fuel cost estimates, and safety ratings for new and used cars and trucks. The app also allows users to input driving habits to personalize results, and to scan QR codes on window stickers while car shopping to assist in comparing vehicles. The app is available to download on the Google Play store and download on the iTunes store.
  • Find and Compare Cars mobile page: The Find and Compare Cars mobile page allows users to search for vehicles by year, make, and model. Searches can also filter by vehicle class and combined miles per gallon (MPG).
  • EPA Fuel Economy Label mobile page: The EPA Fuel Economy Label mobile page explains what each piece of information detailed on fuel economy labels for gasoline, plug-in hybrid, and all-electric vehicles means.
  • Calculate My MPG mobile page: On this page, users receive assistance calculating and tracking fuel economy and comparing it with the EPA ratings. To get started, users must first create an account by accessing the tool online. Look for an update to the mobile page later this year.
  • Gas Mileage Tips mobile page: This page provides drivers with quick tips to obtaining better gas mileage and shows how much money per gallon they can save as a result.

 

You can rate and provide feedback on the Google Play and iTunes stores for the Station Locator and Find-a-Car apps. You may also contact the TRS at any time with feedback about these mobile resources, as well as suggestions for new tools.

 

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team

technicalresponse [at] icf [dot] com

800-254-6735

06.12.17

Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition stakeholders continue to lead the way in decreasing dependence on petroleum, reducing greenhouse gas and criteria emissions, and saving money via alternative fuels and efficiency. To see the full report, please click on this PDF.

05.26.17

FHWA CMAQ Emissions Calculator

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Office of Natural Environment has developed a series of tools to provide technical support and resources for the implementation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) Program. The  Alternative Fuels and Vehicles component provides estimates of emission reductions for CMAQ-funded projects where users are purchasing alternative fuel vehicles to replace a conventional fuel fleet or developing new alternative fuel infrastructure with restricted or unrestricted access. The tool uses emissions rates based on a national-scale run of the EPA MOVES model and alternative fuel factors from Argonne National Laboratory's AFLEET Tool.  Detailed use and methodology are explained in accompanying documentation provided on the FHWA website.  The entire toolkit can be accessed here

05.23.17

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
PRESS CONTACT: Chris Hogan 202.545.4025, CHogan [at] growthenergy [dot] org

American Drivers Surpass 1 Billion Miles on Earth-kind, Engine-Smart E15 Saving up to $72 Million by End of 2017

Cleaner-burning, high-octane E15 has fueled more than 1 billion miles for American motorists around the country 

WASHINGTON, DC — American consumers have helped E15 – a fuel containing 15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline – reach a significant milestone. According to Growth Energy’s ongoing analysis of fuel sales and consumption data reported by major gasoline retailers, drivers across the United States have logged more than 1 billion miles on E15 – attesting to the fuel’s performance, safety, and value. The availability of E15 could save consumers up to $72 million by the end of 2017, based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data.

“American drivers are taking advantage of the proven performance, environmental benefits, and savings E15 provides,” said Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor. “That’s why Congress should pass the Consumer and Fuel Retailer Choice Act and give drivers freedom to choose E15 year-round. This common-sense fix to the Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) law will end confusing restrictions on retailers and allow consumers to choose a fuel that is kinder to the earth, good for their engines, and saves them up to 10 cents per gallon each trip to the pump in the summer.”

Growth Energy is proud to celebrate this milestone and highlight the value E15 delivers in terms of better performance, reduction of toxic emissions, and savings at the pump. Today, E15 is sold at more than 800 retail outlets across 29 states, and its availability continues to grow each day because 21st century drivers are demanding 21st century fuels.

The EPA approves E15 for use in any vehicle manufactured since 2001, which equates to 9 out of 10 cars on the road today. Automakers also approve E15 for use in nearly three-quarters of new cars.

 

Centralina Council of Governments
9815 David Taylor Drive
Charlotte, NC 28262

Part of the U.S.
DOE Clean Cities
National Network